Heading to Granada

by | Mar 17, 2016 | Chasing Freedom Blog | 7 comments

So Here is a quick update. I’m finishing up the website tomorrow. It’s not completely done but here is a preview: http://colinatropical.es/ 

website

As you can see the shortcut worked and we made it to Jete. These are a couple of German Workaway volunteers that we met at a project near ours. It was fun running into them again in town. Unfortunately, they are still sick with Bronchitis. I think I got it from them. I told them about the garlic tea and then the ginger tea. Despite being sick, they really enjoyed the free tapas at the bar. :)

I’m leaving for Granada, Spain on Saturday. I’m going to be taking a two – week Flamenco course there. I’m really excited because I’m going to be staying at housing provided by the school. I’ve wanted to learn Flamenco for more than 15 years and now is my chance!!!!

… and now is my chance!!!!

Not sure I’ll look exactly like this after only two weeks… :)

Sooooo…. I didn’t realize when I was scheduling the course that it coincides with Semana Santa, the biggest holiday and festival in Granada, Spain.

Holy Week, Semana Santa, in Andalucia is an event that literally transforms towns and cities across this region.Processions of elaborately decorated floats with Jesus and Mary statues, groups of pointy-hood wearingNazarenos (penitents), and shrill brass bands, walk slowly through the streets, from their parish church to the cathedral and back. It is an amazing experience, and a great time to come to Andalucia if you want to imbibe some deeply-held traditions that have less to do with religion than with social groupings and rituals. Many people avoid this time of year to visit Andalucia, but if you come prepared, both for the crowds and the inflated prices, then it is well worth the effort. You will never see anything like it again. If you want major pageantry and rich, bejewelled Virgins, Malaga or Seville are the cities to head for. Seville has 60 brotherhoods, some with as many as 2000 members. The biggest stars of the show are the Virgins of Macarena and Triana, both of which make their grand appearance at ‘La Madrugada’, the small hours of Good Friday. From Holy Thursday to Easter Sunday traffic is closed off in city centres and the solemn processions take over in the afternoons (so be sure to do your shopping in the morning). The aroma of burning candles, the passionate strains of a late night saeta and the mournful trumpets that accompany images of Christ and the Virgin Mary create an other-wordly ambience that can transport even the most casual observer to another time and place. But you don’t have to be in a big city to get the Semana Santa vibe – villages and towns of every size have their own celebrations, and each province offers its own variation on the Holy Week theme, with many festivities declared to be of National Interest for Tourists

So, I’m heading to Granada to take Flamenco lessons during the wildest time of the year… I’ll let you know what happens….

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